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jonathan little book on live no-limit cash games

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  • jonathan little book on live no-limit cash games

    page 18 pot odds says opponent puts 20 into a 40 dollar pot. you have to put in 20 dollars for a chance to win 60. your pot odds are 60:20 or 3 to 1. on page 19 the pot odds are computed including the opponents bet and your bet. 32/(50 + 32 +32). the example on page 18 did not include your bet. why are the pot odds being computed differently?

  • #2
    i dont have this book , i cant refer to page 18 to understand the question maybe you can post more in detail for disscussion

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    • #3
      Great question. This had me confused for years and to tell you the truth I still don;t understand it fully.

      I think there are two different ways of working out pot odds.
      One way is 40 dollar pot plus 20 bet = 60 and then you divide 20 by 60 which is 0.33333

      The other way is you add your 20 call to the 60 which =80 and you divide 80 into 20 = 0.25
      So you need 25% equity which is the same as 3 to 1

      I am sure someone here can explain it a lot better.

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      • extrasuper
        extrasuper commented
        Editing a comment
        that helps a lot. thank you.

    • #4
      Originally posted by extrasuper View Post
      page 18 pot odds says opponent puts 20 into a 40 dollar pot. you have to put in 20 dollars for a chance to win 60. your pot odds are 60:20 or 3 to 1. on page 19 the pot odds are computed including the opponents bet and your bet. 32/(50 + 32 +32). the example on page 18 did not include your bet. why are the pot odds being computed differently?
      My guess is both calculations are being done the same way.
      Example 1: $40 pot. $20 bet. So there is $60 in the pot. You have $20 to call. So the % of the total pot you need to put in is $20 / ($40 + $20 + $20) = 25%.
      Example 2: $50 pot. $32 bet. So there is $82 in the pot. You have $32 to call. So the % of the total pot you need to put in is $32 / ($50 + $32 + $32) .

      Does that make sense?

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      • #5
        Originally posted by extrasuper View Post
        page 18 pot odds says opponent puts 20 into a 40 dollar pot. you have to put in 20 dollars for a chance to win 60. your pot odds are 60:20 or 3 to 1. on page 19 the pot odds are computed including the opponents bet and your bet. 32/(50 + 32 +32). the example on page 18 did not include your bet. why are the pot odds being computed differently?
        I think the crucial part you have to understand here is that saying your odds are "1 to 3" is the exact same thing as saying your odds are "1/4", which is 25%. "1 to 3" means for every one time you win, you lose 3 times. It's the win to lose RATIO. That's the same as saying you win one time out of 4 times TOTAL, so 1/4. That's the win PERCENTAGE. Ratio is one thing vs another thing, percentage is one thing vs the total.

        Same with the pot odds calculation. Let's take your example of your opponent putting 20 into a 40 pot: You could either say "if I bet and lose, I lose 20 (my bet), but if I win, I win 40 + 20 (pot + opponent's bet)"—that means it's 20 lose vs 60 win, so a "1 to 3" RATIO. Or you could say "I risk 20 for a chance to own a TOTAL of 80 (pot + opponent's bet + my bet I get to keep)"—that means it's 20/80, so "1/4", which is 25 PERCENT. Same thing.

        I haven't read the book you mentioned, but I think if a book is aimed at beginners, it should stick to percentages (you don't get around those anyway) and never even bring up ratios, since this only leads to confusion and makes the math a lot harder than it has to be.

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