Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Advice for focusing on the correct decision "in the moment"

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Advice for focusing on the correct decision "in the moment"

    When away from the tables I can run through the PC.com quizzes and homework assignments and understand the logical and correct answers, but at times during live play I sometimes find it difficult to apply such rational thoughts, such as putting my opponent on a range, whether it is correct to fold/call/raise, etc.

    Anyone have any advice on if they feel the same, and how best to deal with to make better decisions during your play (which is what we're all here for)

  • #2
    I would play small stakes online. Like 5nl where you’re not concerned about losing a buy in or two and try some crazy moves. See what works and what doesn’t. Of course 5nl and high stakes aren’t one and the same but you have to start somewhere. Also if y study enough over and over you will know what to do in a lot of these spots. Now if I could just get myself to take my own advice lol

    Comment


    • #3
      I think it is also about getting reps in. The more you are in these spots the more they will become second nature. You wont have to think so hard and so long. The mental game of poker by Jared Tendler talk about the learning model. Great read for that. Highly recommend it.

      Comment


      • #4
        I agree with what everybody has been saying. It's all about repetition. You can't do things at the table as quickly when there is time pressure, social pressure and financial pressure. So you do the work off the table to mentally prepare yourself and then over time it will transition to your live play.

        I do think it helps if you try to practice something specific though. Like it's very hard to apply everything you've learned at the table, but it's much easier to try to apply 1 thing you learned in your next session. You might say, I'm working on my check raise frequency from the big blind. So you study that spot. Then you tell yourself in the next session that every time you're in the big blind, you're prepared to use the new stuff you learned. Start with topics that happen more frequently so it's likely you'll have the chance to try it in a session. And what you could be doing is when you're watching other people's hands you can imagine you're in the hand instead. Think about on that flop against that villain, what hands would you check raise in your range. Visualizing yourself in a spot while you're at the table and asking yourself what you would do will help make this become second nature.

        The first time you try something new, you're likely to make mistakes. That's just how it goes. So play down in stakes or try to do things in a way that it's not too expensive to put what you are learning into practice.



        Comment


        • #5
          Right now I'm working on developing a comprehensive decision framework and sequence of actions for live play. I've developed a pretty good foundation in the concepts for cash games already, and I'm continuing to work on mastering these concepts until they're as natural as breathing. But right now, what I think consider, observe, do and in what order is to a degree free-styled. In Dr Cardener's webinar on Creating an Unbeatable Mindset, she discusses the idea of our deliberate vs automatic thinking. I think by creating a concrete process for our decision making and observation we program more decision into our automatic brain process, and give ourselves a strong guide for making the deliberate decisions.

          Comment


          • Dilly
            Dilly commented
            Editing a comment
            I think there's also a Matt Afleck webinar on decision frameworks as well

        • #6
          I heard a poker coach give a tip relating to making better decisions.

          He said to pretend that you are looking at yourself playing at the table. Put yourself in the shoes of an outsider looking on at the game.
          Last edited by Joseph; 01-28-2020, 08:13 PM.

          Comment


          • #7
            Alex Fitzgerald pushes us to consider the most important thought in a given situation. You start by being able to accurately determine your situation (I flop mediocre pair versus one opponent who is the aggressor) and then the most important thought (how many streets is he betting and what is my response? what turn cards help me, how many are there?). I have found these bring huge clarity to my decisions and that other decisions tend to waterfall from there. It also makes it easier to go with the logical decision. For example, when I realize that he probably bets turn 80-90% of the time and that I get a card I like maybe 5% of the time, well might as well fold now than donate money just to fold the turn.

            Comment


            • Joseph
              Joseph commented
              Editing a comment
              Sounds good Peter. One question that has bugged me for a long time. I have watched Alex Fitz give loads of examples where he asks the question " What is the most important thought? "
              Sometimes I don't know the answer to this question. Do you get the same most important thought as Alex always or nearly always?

            • 1Peter510
              1Peter510 commented
              Editing a comment
              I have studied several of his programs including how to think like a poker player where he outlines all the most important thoughts he uses. I have written them down and study them regularly. So, yeh I tend to get them right in the quizes.

            • Joseph
              Joseph commented
              Editing a comment
              Ok Peter thanks for explaining that to me.
          Working...
          X