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What hand ranges to call 3 bets with?

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  • What hand ranges to call 3 bets with?

    Hi All,

    I am looking for some charts to help with what hands / how to play after being 3 bet both pre and post flop but specifically for 6 max cash. I have found some charts on Poker Coaching but not for 6 max.

    Can anyone help?

  • #2
    Those charts probably apply, the only real difference in 6-Max is you you're only using your LJ-BB ranges, not including UTG-+2. 6 Max is the same as full ring, you just assume UTG, +1, and +2 folded.

    General strategy is the same as any other time really, when we RFI and get 3-Bet, we should be 4-betting our absolute best hands, calling with hands that are getting a good price and have solid post-flop playability, and assuming we're against competent opponents and want to be balanced we'll be 4-betting some hands not quite good enough to call the 3-bet.

    We're more inclined to call when we're IP, and more inclined to 4-bet or fold when we're OOP.

    When facing a 3-bet, our strategy is very opponent dependent, especially at the low stakes-- a good percentage of opponents are only 3-betting the nuts, we can play much tighter against these opponents. Another decent percentage of the population is 3-betting linear because they over-value good but not nuttish holdings (KQ, AJ, 99-JJ, etc.)...in my experience you don't come across many opponents at low stakes, especially live, who are 3-betting a strong polarized range.

    Comment


    • thereitis
      thereitis commented
      Editing a comment
      Pokercoaching has the GTO charts mentioned below by jamtay317 . Those charts are very different because they don't recommend flatting raises against better opponents other than in the button and big blind. So the chart's 3bet ranges are linear ranges instead of polar since you can just take all the hands you would have called with and 3bet them instead. When I play 6max online, I pretty much exclusively use the GTO charts. I play $50NL Blitz on ACR. I don't know if my results would be better or worse at those stakes playing the non GTO charts.

      But I have seen a variety of posts online that all recommend when you're playing micro / low stakes with super high rake, that the strategy above tends to be better. Play less hands to reduce the effect of rake. 3bet more to win more hands preflop to reduce the effect of rake. Flat less against better opponents who will squeeze more if given the opportunity.

  • #3
    https://members.pokercoaching.com/cl...preflop-charts

    Here are the 6 max charts.

    As far as post flop the charts don't exist. Just flat to many scenarios. to learn this you just need to work with a solver.

    Comment


    • #4
      Originally posted by Dilly View Post
      Those charts probably apply, the only real difference in 6-Max is you you're only using your LJ-BB ranges, not including UTG-+2. 6 Max is the same as full ring, you just assume UTG, +1, and +2 folded.

      General strategy is the same as any other time really, when we RFI and get 3-Bet, we should be 4-betting our absolute best hands, calling with hands that are getting a good price and have solid post-flop playability, and assuming we're against competent opponents and want to be balanced we'll be 4-betting some hands not quite good enough to call the 3-bet.

      We're more inclined to call when we're IP, and more inclined to 4-bet or fold when we're OOP.

      When facing a 3-bet, our strategy is very opponent dependent, especially at the low stakes-- a good percentage of opponents are only 3-betting the nuts, we can play much tighter against these opponents. Another decent percentage of the population is 3-betting linear because they over-value good but not nuttish holdings (KQ, AJ, 99-JJ, etc.)...in my experience you don't come across many opponents at low stakes, especially live, who are 3-betting a strong polarized range.
      Thanks Dilly much appreciated, I had read about taking out the first 3 positions before so will take a look at the full ring charts and adjust accordingly.

      Comment


      • #5
        Originally posted by jamtay317 View Post
        https://members.pokercoaching.com/cl...preflop-charts

        Here are the 6 max charts.

        As far as post flop the charts don't exist. Just flat to many scenarios. to learn this you just need to work with a solver.
        Thanks - I have seen these although there are no facing a 3 bet charts here.

        Comment


        • thereitis
          thereitis commented
          Editing a comment
          If we gave you 6-max GTO charts for how you respond to 3bets, you would waste a lot of money following them. Most of your opponents will be too passive and 3bet a value heavy range. So you should be defending far less than GTO against most opponents. We are considering creating charts that simulate the types of opponents you will often face but that's going to differ a lot at $10NL vs $50NL vs $200NL etc.

      • #6
        THE5AMC

        The problem with 'how to respond to 3bet' charts is that they are so incredibly opponent specific.

        If I was you I'd get out a pen and paper (or fire up an excel sheet on your pc) and get to work with Equilab. Here's how:


        You know your opening range, your opening bet size, and the villain's 3bet size.

        We can use this information to work out for ourselves how we should be responding.

        To work out the pot odds we need to do: bet / (bet + bet + pot).

        So, if we RFI to 3bb and the villain makes it 10bb then we can do: 7 / ( 7 + 7 + 7.5 ) = 33%.

        Okay so we know we our hand needs to have at least 33% equity to be able to continue.

        In Equilab enter the range that you put your opponent on and then you can literally go through the different hands in your opening range and see how much equity they have against the villain's range.

        Now clearly we want to be 4betting with the top of our range, but do we need to be balanced?

        If we think our opponent is either going to 5-bet or fold then we want to be raising with a polarised range. As well as our premium hands we should be including hands that fall just outside of the required equity to be able to continue. That way we have an easy decision if we do get 5bet: we continue with premium and fold the 'junk'.

        If we suspect our opponent is going to flat a lot of our 4bets then we do not want to be 4betting with the hands outside of the 33% equity as we know we are likely to be behind. Here we can bet in a linear fashion and include more hands from the top of our range that are still likely to be way ahead of villain's wide flatting range.


        So that's how we do it in a nutshell. Once you get the hang of this you should start experimenting with different variables. In this example we had the villain 3betting to 10bb, but what if he made it 12bb? Or even 20bb? How would that affect the equity we needed to continue and therefore our 4betting range? We can also change the villain's 3betting range. Say you assign him a 5% 3betting range the first time, try expanding this to a 15% betting range. Then explore how much wider you can defend whilst still getting the required equity that you need.


        Hope that's useful buddy; please let me know if anything isn't clear

        Comment


        • #7
          One thing I would add to LondonImp's post is to consider your position. When playing OOP it's usually best to 4bet or fold unless you're getting the right price to set mine. If playing IP you can flat more with your clean out combos that play well like middle suited connectors. Of course this is very general and depends on villain, cash/mtt, stack depths etc.

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