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  • Are you staring at others

    Me not so far. I am always stoic and avoid eye contact and I play basically my online Game. I am just not Confident enough live

    I am only observing others when I am Not involvend in the Hand

    i would like to stare at others but then I am scared they will pick up on me / have my number. I dont wear sunglasses. Thoughts?

  • #2
    Wear sunglasses? I understand the argument for not wearing them, but it helps me a lot still so I still do. I do want to develop my observation and coversion ability without them too, but I'm not quite there yet enough for my satisfaction, so I'm still 80% sunglasses. It doesn't hurt to bring them, try going without them, then pull them out if you think you need them based on who you're playing against or your general comfort level.

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    • #3
      I have never wore sun glasses at the table.

      And yes, I stare at players.

      In fact, I've had one player tell me that they avoid marginal hands with me because my stare intimidates them. They would rather fold than have me stare at them.

      1) Do not look at your cards until it is your turn to act. Instead look at everyone else looking at their cards.

      2) Do not look at the flop or any other board card being dealt, instead look at your opponent while they look at the flop.

      3) Look at your opponent during his action, look at everything. Look at where his eyes go while thinking, look at the way he cuts his chips, look at the way he bets. Look at his actions after he bets.

      4) On your turn, look at your opponent while you are thinking. Look at him while you are betting or checking. Look at his reaction after your action. Did he seem happy or sad or relieved after you made the action that you made.


      All of these are good spots to pick up tells.

      Comment


      • Guido
        Guido commented
        Editing a comment
        Wow really Good advice
        When i act like you recommend I really think this can bring me to the next Live Level. Thx

        Side note to do so you Need to be Confident in your Technical skills for obvious reasons

    • #4
      Originally posted by jjpregler View Post

      1) Do not look at your cards until it is your turn to act. Instead look at everyone else looking at their cards.

      2) Do not look at the flop or any other board card being dealt, instead look at your opponent while they look at the flop.

      3) Look at your opponent during his action, look at everything. Look at where his eyes go while thinking, look at the way he cuts his chips, look at the way he bets. Look at his actions after he bets.

      4) On your turn, look at your opponent while you are thinking. Look at him while you are betting or checking. Look at his reaction after your action. Did he seem happy or sad or relieved after you made the action that you made.
      I think points 2, 3, and 4 are all really good advice.

      Point 1 however, as mainstream an opinion as it is, may not always be best. The issue is that when it is finally time to look at your cards, all of your opponents are now looking at you. They also have more time to watch you then you would trying to watch every single other player all look at their cards at the same time.

      The risk is not worth the reward.


      For what it's worth this is not a point of view that I came up with myself. It might have been from Mr Little's earlier books, can't remember for sure...

      Comment


      • RealJPB
        RealJPB commented
        Editing a comment
        This is unrelated to how best not to give off tells, but I've found waiting to look at my hand valuable in that it allows me to process the action and think of the my range before my thoughts are influenced by seeing my actual holding.

      • LondonImp
        LondonImp commented
        Editing a comment
        If you do prefer to watch your opponents before looking at your cards, you should be watching the people who will be acting after you, not the people who's action you will witness beforehand anyway. Are the people to your left already holding their cards and ready to muck? Are they already eyeing up the stacks for a raise? If you are on the CO and you can see the button has already given up the hand then you can open with a button range instead - essentially stealing the position.

    • #5
      Is staring better without or with sunglasses ?

      if without is it better to Start staring with sunglasses to get more Confident in staring?

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      • #6
        You will find with sunglasses that you can look in a slight different direction but still see them out of the corner of your eye.
        loads of people wear them so don't be afraid of looking stupid at first.
        You might find they are too dark to see the suits though and the only light ones I know of are blue shark optics, which are a little pricey and still have a little reflection of light on the inside depending on the model.
        You are just going to have to get comfortable looking at people - who cares, it's a game, you can just laugh it off.

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        • #7
          Wear sunglasses? I understand the argument for not wearing them, but it helps me a lot still so I still do. I do want to develop my observation and coversion ability without them too, but I'm not quite there yet enough for my satisfaction, so I'm still 80% sunglasses. It doesn't hurt to bring them, try going without them, then pull them out if you think you need them based on who you're playing against or your general comfort level.

          Comment


          • #8
            Following jj's advice above, I made a conscious effort to stare at my opponent whilst I was thinking at a live MTT I was in recently.

            I began stacking a pile of chips to the side of my main stack (in no way was this angle-shooting, I was clearly counting) and as I reached a certain point villain made a very slight movement with his hands towards his cards as if he had subconsciously decided to fold.

            I reduced my bet to about 70% of what I was planning and got called by a hand I fully expect him to have folded had I gone with the bet size I was originally stacking up.

            Normally I would not have picked up on this and made a bigger bet and lost value. Good fun.

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