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Should I Multi-Table When Improvement Is My Focus?

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  • Should I Multi-Table When Improvement Is My Focus?

    After a long break from poker I returned to the game 3/4 months ago. I've been studying quite a bit and playing about 3k hands per week at 10NL with a current win rate of 7bb/100. I normally play on 4 tables which is comfortable but leaves little time for any serious analysis while in a hand. There would seem to be an obvious trade off between playing 1 or 2 tables vs 4 when learning new skill sets.

    By playing more tables you create more volume for review and study but you aren't able to implement strategies very well in real time.

    By playing fewer tables you have more time for analysis in game but less material to review and study off table.

    Which approach would you say is best when my goal is to learn and implement basic strategies like range vs range, combos and bet sizing?

  • #2
    I would think that if you have PokerTraker then 4 should be fine. Just review all of your hands at the end of the day or the next day.

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    • MrFuss
      MrFuss commented
      Editing a comment
      I am using PT4. This is the direction Im leaning towards.

  • #3
    I would recommend 2-tabling if you usually do 4 but maybe not for the reason you'd think. If you do less, you get more bored, which leads you to bluff more, which you can learn a lot from. When to 3-bet light, which combos are good for bluffing, what blockers you have, etc, etc. I say bored, but it's really a greater amount of focus to the subtleties of the situation. You also get a better feel for what the HUD stats mean. If you're watching a guy play and then see what his stats end up you have an intimate feel for the numbers.

    However, 4 isn't really that many tables, so I think that's fine too. GL!

    Comment


    • MrFuss
      MrFuss commented
      Editing a comment
      2 tables is def boring and I do tend to bluff more lol.

  • #4
    I recommend play 4 on 3/4 of times and put in one focus Session where you only play 2 , perhaps you even Record the focus Session to watch it later because you will then realize other aspects.. I did it a few times

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    • #5
      If you feel comfortable playing 4 tables then I would say stick to 4.

      If you are doing enough work away from the tables then the skills you are learning should soon fall into the 'unconscious competent' (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_stages_of_competence).

      Just be sure to keep an eye out in your post-game analysis for any bad habits that you might be falling into because, by the very definition of unconscious competence, you won't be aware you've fallen into them.

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      • #6
        Originally posted by Guido View Post
        perhaps you even Record the focus Session to watch it later because you will then realize other aspects.. I did it a few times
        Interesting. What would you expect to realize that would be overlooked using PT4 replayer to review a session?
        Last edited by MrFuss; 08-27-2019, 11:17 AM.

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        • reeeeeeper
          reeeeeeper commented
          Editing a comment
          Timing tells for one, local context also possibly (possible tilt, eg)

      • #7
        Originally posted by LondonImp View Post
        If you feel comfortable playing 4 tables then I would say stick to 4.

        If you are doing enough work away from the tables then the skills you are learning should soon fall into the 'unconscious competent' (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_stages_of_competence).

        Just be sure to keep an eye out in your post-game analysis for any bad habits that you might be falling into because, by the very definition of unconscious competence, you won't be aware you've fallen into them.
        I've asked this question on a few forums and this is the first "theory" based answer where most are subjective. I'm solidly in phase 2.

        Conscious incompetence Though the individual does not understand or know how to do something, they recognize the deficit, as well as the value of a new skill in addressing the deficit. The making of mistakes can be integral to the learning process at this stage.

        At this stage the mistakes are more valuable than trying to implement a strategy I dont fully understand.
        Great comment. Thanks!

        Comment


        • #8
          Originally posted by MrFuss View Post
          The making of mistakes can be integral to the learning process at this stage.
          This bit is actually very important. Something to bear in mind is that poker forums are full of people looking to address mistakes that they've made in their own games and are looking to correct. It can be extremely valuable to work through all of these yourself too - it is far cheaper to learn from other people's mistakes than your own!

          Also, thank you for the feedback

          Comment


          • #9
            I play one zoom now for cash but if tournies I will load 4 up expecting to lose 3 and go deep in 1 that I can focus on.
            I've never been able to multi table more than 4. I can't actually understand how people do 20 eben with a HUD.

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