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  • New to PC. Posting old homework here.

    As the title suggests, Im new to pokercoaching.com. I will be using this thread to post my answers to old homework assignments that do not have an open thread in the homework forum for the following reasons.
    1. I want to be working through these assignments as they seem to be the most valuable content.
    2. I want to practice posting homework answers in the forum correctly.
    3. I want to have my answers available for review when watching the corresponding webinars.

    Any responses, feedback or conversation is certainly welcome however that is not the main purpose of this thread.

  • #2
    2016 - 04 - 27

    Everyone folds to you on the button on the first hand of a $1,500 WSOP event. The players in the blinds are middle-aged males who seem to be recreational players. You have 7,500 chips at 25/50. What is your raising range and why?



    I will be opening 50% @ 3BB. At 150BB deep we have plenty of room to manuever and losing a small pot is not detrimental if we run into a strong hand. I believe I can outplay rec players in position after the flop, especially in the beginning of a WSOP event as the opponents are more likely to play cautiously than to get out of line.


    If one of the blinds 3bets this would be my continuing range. Of course there are other variables such as if the 3bet comes from SB or BB and if SB 3bets and BB calls however I dont think the intention of this assignment is to delve that deep into the scenario so this is a generic range based on one opponent 3betting from either blind and the other opponent folding.

    Based on the original opening range of 50%...

    1. This range is fairly balanced with 53.8% folding and 46.2% continuing
    2. Call = 27.5% vs 4bet = 19.8% for a 1.3:1 call:raise ratio
    3. 4bet bluff = 11.5% vs 4bet value = 7.3% for a 1.5:1 bluff:value ratio
    4. My offsuit 4bet bluffs block all broadway cards and stand a reasonable chance to get my opponent to fold their equity advantage
    Last edited by MrFuss; 08-04-2019, 11:40 AM.

    Comment


    • #3
      2016-05-24

      Everyone folds to the button, a world-class player who is generally loose and aggressive, who raises to 2.5 big blinds. The small blind folds. You are in the big blind with a 25 big blind stack. Define your strategy with each part of your range.



      I would assume a world class LAG is rasing pretty wide on the button. With a 25bb stack I'd rather not play a hand OOP against a tough opponent. There should be enough fold equity here to shove this 77% range with positive EV.

      Comment


      • #4
        2016-06-25

        Everyone folds to you in the small blind with 100 big blind stacks. The player in the big blind is a world-class player who plays well. You have no history with your opponent. Your opponent likely assumes that you are competent. Define your strategy with each part of your range.




        A pro player is likely to call any standard raise and I dont want to play a bigger pot out of position against a good opponent. In the SB Im getting great odds to see a flop and that is my main goal. By limping we give ourselves the best chance to see a flop with good odds. If BB raises I will fold my trash hands, call with a wide range as we're still getting great odds and 3bet a polarized range. When facing a raise we're continuing 77% of the time which makes it hard for BB to exploit us by always raising our limp. 3betting polarized gives us great board coverage and will make it harder for the opponent to play against us on the flop. Our 3betting range is fairly balanced with 7% of our opening range value hands and 8% being bluffs.

        Comment


        • kkep
          kkep commented
          Editing a comment
          I like this and have been working in a similar strategy late in tournaments.
          However this deep I don't think we should be to concerned with pot size as long as we play well post flop.

        • MrFuss
          MrFuss commented
          Editing a comment
          My process with these early homework assignments is to first watch the related webinars and take notes. Then the next day I come back and complete the homework. "Not playing a big pot OOP against a good player" is straight from Jonathan's webinar so Im going to heed his warning

        • kkep
          kkep commented
          Editing a comment
          Why in the hell would you take his advice over mine?
          Good stuff, thanks for the reply.

      • #5
        2016-08-25

        A generally solid player in first position raises to 3 big blinds out of his 100 big blind effective stack. You are in second position. Everyone else at the table is reasonably tight and aggressive, with no one being a blatant maniac. Define your strategy with each part of your range.



        UTG's range is very strong and I want to choose a range that can play well against it. In this scenario I want to keep all my nut hands in my calling range so that Im able to defend against a late position squeeze. It appears my range is capped when in fact I have all the nuts which makes it difficult for either UTG or those left to act to play well against me.

        Comment


        • #6
          2016-09-13

          Everyone folds to you in the hijack seat (seat to the right of the cutoff) and you raise to 3 big blinds out of your 100 big blind effective stack. Only the big blind, an unknown, but likely competent, player calls. The flop comes Js-6c-3s. Which hands are you continuation betting and for how much? Which hands are you checking?

          On this flop Im betting a large percentage of my range made up of my strong hands, draws and hands with little SDV. Since Im betting a large percentage of the time I want to bet smaller, like 30%-40% pot. My opponent needs to continue with a wider range which keeps hands Im beating in play. And I dont need many folds for this bet sizing to be profitable. With my top pair hands Im probably betting AJ, KJ 100% of the time and J with weaker kicker maybe around 50% of the time.

          Click image for larger version

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          My checking range is going to be marginal hands with showdown value which are the weaker top pairs, PP below TP, any sixes and AK, AQ . I dont want to get x/r when betting these hands. Im looking to call 1 or 2 streets and get to showdown depending on runout. This also protects my checking range so that its not transparently weak. I want to be able to call future streets with some frequency after checking.

          Comment


          • #7
            2016-11-18

            You have played a somewhat straightforward strategy for a few hours without showing any memorable bluffs. You raise from the cutoff to 3 big blinds out of your 100 effective big blind stack. Only the big blind, a splashy calling station, calls. The flop comes Ks-Jc-6s. Your opponent checks. Assume you have A-K, K-7, Q-J, 9-9, A-6, 7-6, 5-5, Q-T, Q-9, or 9-8. Which hands should you check and why?



            When playing vs a calling station our range skews slightly towards betting for value. Some of our typical marginal hands become premium hands when we're more likely to get called by worse holdings. Im checking my marginal hands and my junk. Checking marginal hands balances my checking range because Im able to call a turn bet on most cards and go from there.

            Comment


            • MrFuss
              MrFuss commented
              Editing a comment
              forgot to include the suited hands here. oops

          • #8
            2016-12-15

            The action folds to a reasonably loose and aggressive player in the cutoff who raises to 2.5 big blinds out of his 50 effective big blind effective stack. You are in the small blind. The player in the big blind plays well. Define your preflop strategy with each part of your range.

            Click image for larger version

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            A LAG is likely raising a fairly wide range from the CO. With a good player in the BB I would like to use a 3betting strategy to discourage the BB to get involved. If the BB were a weaker player I would use a wider calling strategy with fewer 3bet bluffs because we want to play hands vs weaker opponenents. This 3betting range lets us call with hands that flop reasonably well. We have almost 2:1 ratio of 3bet bluffs to 3bet value which gives us lots of fold equity vs the CO wide opening range. If the CO calls our 3bet we have hands that play reasonably well and mostly straight forward. If we get shoved on we can fold all of our bluffs and only continue with our strongest value hands.

            Comment


            • #9
              2017-01-24

              You have played a somewhat straightforward strategy for a few hours without showing any memorable bluffs. You raise from the cutoff to 3 big blinds out of your 100 effective big blind stack. Only the big blind, a splashy calling station, calls. The flop comes 9s-8c-6d. Your opponent checks. Assume you have 6-6, 9-8, A-A, T-T. Q-9, A-8, 8-7, 7-7, J-6, 2-2, A-K, Q-T, or K-5. Which hands should you check and why?

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              When playing vs a calling station we can bet our marginal hands for value because a calling station will continue more often with worse hands like ace high and junky draws.
              In this scenario...
              (Premium bets) TP+
              (Draw bets) pairs w/ straight draws, straight draws, pairs w/ backdoor flush draws and overcards
              (Marginal bets) middle and bottom pairs
              (Junk checks) underpairs and no pairs

              This strategy has a ratio of 1.5:1 (draws : premium) & 1:1 (junk : marginal) which is nicely balanced.
              Last edited by MrFuss; 08-12-2019, 08:01 AM.

              Comment


              • #10
                2017-02-16

                A loose aggressive player raises to 3 big blinds out of his 100 big blind effective stack from the lojack seat. The cutoff and hijack, both somewhat typical players who play in a straightforward manner, call. You call on the button. The flop comes Kc-6s-5d. Everyone checks to you. Assume you have K-Q, K-7, 9-8, 8-7, A-6, 5-4, 2-2, A-4, or Q-9. What is your flop strategy with each of these hands and why?

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                When the LAG opener checks I'm fairly confident he doesnt have a king. And similarly when the 2 straight forward players check I assume they also dont have any decent made hand or draw. This allows me to bet the majority of my range and I would turn my marginal made hands into value bets. If I got the read that the opponents had no interest in continuing I would probably bet 100% of my range, capitalizing on my position and the weakness the opponents have shown.

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